WikiSilo: A Self-organizing, Crowd Sourcing System for Interdisciplinary Science (poster)

Leibovitz, D. P., West, R. L. & Belanger, M. (2014) WikiSilo: A Self-organizing, Crowd Sourcing System for Interdisciplinary Science. Poster presented at the 36th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2014), Quebec City, Canada. [doi10.13140/2.1.3139.9048] (PDF)

Leibovitz, West & Belanger (2014) WikiSilo (Poster)Abstract: WikiSilo is a tool for theorizing across interdisciplinary fields such as Cognitive Science using a specific vocabulary and structure. It is designed to show if a particular cognitive theory is complete and coherent at multiple levels of discourse, and commensurable with and relevant to a wider domain of cognition. WikiSilo is also a minimalist theory and methodology about effectively doing science, and is therefore a form of epistemizing. WikiSilo theory provides for a disciplined exploration of explanatory space via an axiomatic hierarchy of epistemizing and ontologizing postulates. The WikiSilo tool, via a software version control system, supports the long term goal of working toward coherent and unified theories. More generally, WikiSilo facilitates self-organization leading to academic silos with well-defined conceptual frameworks that are vertically related as compared to poorly related ad-hoc academic fiefdoms.

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Dendritic+ Processing in an Emergic Network Model of Narrow Slit Viewing (Poster)

Leibovitz & West (2013) Dendritic+ Processing in an Emergic Network Model of Narrow Slit Viewing (POSTER)Leibovitz, D. P. & West, R. L. (2013) Dendritic+ Processing in an Emergic Network Model of Narrow Slit Viewing. Poster presented to the the 12th International Conference on Cognitive Modeling (ICCM 2013), Ottawa: Carleton University. [doi: 10.13140/RG.2.1.2849.2002] (pdf)

Abstract: Accounting for dendritic+ processing facilitates richer neural encoding schemes that can ultimately lead to simpler networks while improving their neurobiological plausibility. Dendritic+ processing is an example of several modeling tradeoffs: how local complexifications can improve global simplicity, and how functional network circuitry can be traded against representational circuitry. This is demonstrated within a model of narrow slit viewing based on an emergic network architecture (Leibovitz & West, 2013).

Keywords: Dendritic processing; Emergic Cognitive Model (ECM); Emergic Network (EN); Flowcentric; Neural coding; Representation; Slit Viewing; Unified Modeling.

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Emergence of Border & Surface Completion (both Spatial and Temporal) in a Flowcentric Model of Narrow Slit Viewing (Invited Talk)

Leibovitz, D. P. & West, R. L. (2013) Emergence of Border & Surface Completion (both Spatial and Temporal) in a Flowcentric Model of Narrow Slit Viewing. Invited talk presented to the 12th International Conference on Cognitive Modeling (ICCM 2013), Ottawa: Carleton University. [doi10.13140/RG.2.1.2169.2647] (PPTX; PDF)

Abstract: In this talk, we describe a Leibovitz & West (2013) Emergence of Border & Surface Completion (Talk)model of narrow slit viewing that deals with both spatial and temporal completion for borders and surfaces. The model is based on functionality derived from the dynamic interactions of a neural model. We contrast this model with FACADE, which models vision using neural models of modules corresponding to functionality.

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Understanding each other: Defining a conceptual space for cognitive modeling (poster)

West, R. L., & Leibovitz, D. P. (2012). Understanding each other: Defining a conceptual space for cognitive modeling. Poster presented at the 34th annual meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2012). Sapporo, Japan.

Abstract: Cognitive modeling is a complex endeavor so it is not surprising that the goals and intentions of modelers are often misunderstood, even by other modelers. To try to clarify this we have attempted to map out the various philosophical and theoretical commitments that one makes when creating a cognitive model or architecture. The goal of this is to avoid misunderstandings between the adherents of different modeling systems and between cognitive modelers and the rest of the scientific community.

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Modelling visual processing via emergence (Invited Talk)

Leibovitz, D. P. (2012) Modelling visual processing via emergence. Invited talk presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science (CSBBCS) in the Computational understanding of Cognition Symposium. pp. 1-43, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. [doi10.13140/RG.2.1.5141.9368]

Leibovitz (2012) Modelling visual processing via emergence (CSBBCS) (Cover)Abstract: A model of low level visual processing is outlined along with a demonstration of the numerous phenomena it unifies. Specifically – filling in, visual memory, image stability, color homogeneity, blind spot, temporal edge detection, eye blink – phenomena that would ordinarily be investigated under different sub fields and with disparate models. The model is based on the interaction between recurrence and eye motion. The model is built using the Emergic Network system, which is a new cognitive modeling system created for this project and others like it. Emergic Networks facilitate the exploration of how recurrent and distributed functions produce functional emergent effects. I will present an overview of the Emergic Network System and the simulation results for each phenomena it models.

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Cognitive Re-Use via Emergic Networks (poster)

Leibovitz, D. P., & West, R. L. (2012) Cognitive Re-Use via Emergic Networks. Poster presented at the 11th International Conference on Cognitive Modeling (ICCM 2012), Berlin, Germany. pp. 1-12. [doi10.13140/RG.2.1.4218.2884]

Leibovitz & West (2012) Cognitive Re-Use via Emergic Networks (ICCM Poster)Abstract: In this poster we introduce a new cognitive modeling system called Emergic Networks. The Emergic Network system is designed to facilitate functional, nonlinear decomposition with the aim of understanding how different neural systems can interact to produce specific instances of cognitive functionality. The first part of the paper briefly describes the motivation for the system and the second part briefly describes the system and provides a web location for downloading.

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MinIdent – A Data Base for Minerals and a Computer Program for Their Identification

Smith, D. G. W., & Leibovitz, D. P. (1986) MinIdent – A Data Base for Minerals and a Computer Program for Their Identification. Program with Abstracts GAC, MAC, CGU-AGC, AMC, UCG: Joint Annual Meeting, May 19-21, 1986, Carleton University, Ottawa. Abstracts 11: 129. [doi10.13140/RG.2.1.1667.5048] (pdf)

MinIdent-PCAbstract: MinIdent is an interactive mineral identification and mineral data base management program, now rewritten in FORTRAN 77. Data have been stored for about 4000 mineral groups, species and varieties. These data include composition, optical properties in transmitted and reflected light, symmetry, unit cell dimensions, densities, Vickers and Mohs hardness, d-values and relative intensities of the 5 strongest X-ray powder-diffraction lines, JCPDS numbers, any polymorphs, occurrences, localities, year first described and sources of the data. However, not all minerals yet have data stored for all these fields.

The program can be used to generate a list of minerals having properties within within the ranges input for an unidentified mineral or can be made to display and rank the twenty most likely identities for an unknown. The program can also be used to tabulate chosen properties of matched minerals, or to tabulate minerals in the data base that have certain specified properties. Alternatively, all analytical and other data stored for a particular mineral can be displayed.

Tests using data for known minerals to simulate unknowns indicate a high degree of reliability given accurate input information, and a surprising success rate even when input data are qualitative in character.

The MinIdent identification and data base management software uses about 400 kbytes of memory and the data base used in mineral identification currently uses less than 4 Mbytes. Running times for typical identification procedures range between about 0.5 and 3.0 seconds of CPU time on the AMDAHL 580/FF mainframe computer on which the program has been developed. The cycle time of this computer is about 23 ns. MinIdent can be accessed globally via data communications networks such as DATAPAC, TELENET and TYMNET.

Application of the MinIdent data base and software are envisaged wherever earth scientists are faced with the task of mineral identification. Such areas of specialization include petrology (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary), economic geology (ore mineralogy, mineral exploration and mineral beneficiation), geochemistry, meteorites and crystallography.

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